7 November 2015

Fireworks





Dear friends,


To celebrate the opening of Spectra, I have prepared a special autumn spectacle in collaboration with the night sky titled Fireworks. The performance takes place every night, from 20 October to 30 November, with the best viewing times from 5 to12 November, between midnight and dawn.

Moving from the northeastern to northwestern sky deep in the night, the Taurid meteors will perform silent fireworks as they flare up and burn guided in their motion by the Sun and the planets.

Every year for five months, the Earth ploughs through the debris of the Taurid meteor swarm - a vast swathe of material left behind after the breakup of a super-comet in the distant past. For this performance, the swarm returns more intensely with elevated rates and an increased number of bright fireballs, with a peak for the opening of Spectra before the dawn of the 7th of November. The show continues nightly until the 30th of November.

Take a moment to find a dark spot away from the city lights. Sit or lie down under the stars for 20 minutes to let your eyes adjust to the darkness.

Enjoy the final dance of the iceballs left over from the formation of stars and planets billions of years ago, as they flare up and evaporate attracted by the pull of the Sun.

Fireworks is a durational spectacle visible to the naked eye, a choreography for a meteor swarm, the Earth, the Sun and an observer. It is a ritual of endings and returns.

It is the fifth performance in the series of my collaborations with the night sky titled Further Investigations Into Choreography, part of a larger series of collaborations with the weather titled Telling Future.

Enjoy the return!

Entrance: free
Location: worldwide
Performance times: 20 October – 30 November 2015, from midnight til dawn
Best viewing conditions: Outdoors, in the dark, in clear skies.
Dress code: warm clothes
Fireworks intensity: 5-10 fireballs an hour.

Credits: Andrea Božić in collaboration with the Taurid meteor swarm, the Sun and the weather

Spectra: Light Like a Bird, Not Like a Feather by Andrea Božić and Julia Willms at the Vienna Art Foundation - Kunstraum am Schauplatz is open 6-26 November 2015


23 February 2015

Day for Night: Total Eclipse of the Equinox Sun




Dear friends,

This is a special invitation to my new performance in collaboration with the eclipse of the sun and the spring equinox.

The performance is a once in a 500 000 years event.

For the 20th of March, the beginning of spring in the Northern Hemisphere and autumn in the Southern, I have prepared a special spectacle titled Day for Night (Total Eclipse of Equinox Sun). The piece features a total eclipse of the Sun that will turn day into night at the moment of the same length of day and night in the whole world. The eclipse of the sun will interrupt this equilibrium of light and darkness.

Day for Night is the fourth performance in the series of my collaborations with the night sky titled: Night Sky: Further Investigations Into Choreography, part of the larger cycle of collaborations with the weather titled Telling Future. For this dance, three celestial bodies will align in a straight line. The full blood-red Moon will pass between the Earth and the Sun, temporarily disrupting the coming of the light.

The premium seats for the performance are at the North Pole. As the sun rises at the horizon for the first time after six months of darkness at the North Pole, the Moon moves in front of the Sun and day becomes night again.

The performance will affect all our senses: the temperature falls, insects and birds stop making sounds, the tides get more extreme and the landscape changes dramatically in only a few moments. We are in the Moon’s shadow and we see the Moon’s dark side. Dreams and secrets emerge in the dark.

Seats for the performance in the Moon’s shadow are unlimited but visibility depends on your area. Seats are available with up to 90% degrees of visibility in North Africa, Europe, western Asia, the Pacific, East Asia, Iceland and Greenland. The Netherlands, where we are based, will enjoy the spectacular 87% visibility.

Watch the preview trailer here


European performance time:

Friday, 20 March 2015

Beginning: 9:30
Peak:10.37
End: 11:48

Latecomers admitted.
Search for your location for the visibility in your area here
For the seats distribution overview, click here and here

Follow updates here

Cloudy where you are? We are sending an expedition team to the North Atlantic to bring you live coverage. 
Watch the live broadcast here or here


! Warning:
Looking at the Sun is harmful to your eyes at any time. Do not look at the Sun directly without protection! Doing so may result in immediate and permanent blindness.

Viewing instructions:
For instructions on how to build your own pinhole camera for safe viewing, click here
If you are not the D.I.Y. type, check in with your local natural history or space museum or your local astronomy club for where to rent or buy eclipse glasses.
In Benelux, order your glasses here

Day for Night is an immersive dramatic spectacle for three celestial bodies and an observer that deals with the questions of drama, control, authorship, personal responsibility and engagement in space-wide events.

From the press:
‘When the lights, the Sun and the Moon are ‘eclipsed’, we are in the dark and events are hidden and shadowy. Secrets emerge and what’s unknown comes to light.’

‘Stunning and awe-inspiring.‘

‘Many cultures have perceived eclipses as change-inducing events. The eclipse of the sun is always a disruption of the normal order and a possibility of a new beginning.’
  

Take a moment to tune in and enjoy the reboot!


Greetings!


Andrea


Seat distribution chart:



Best seats: North Pole, Svalbard and Faroe Islands
2nd and 3rd rank seats: North Africa, Europe, western Asia, the Pacific, East Asia, Iceland and Greenland

Entrance: free
In case you document the show, I would be very pleased to receive your photos.

Disclaimer: I would like to apologize for the disruptions for the Europe solar energy grid the performance might cause, as temperatures may drop 6C in 30 minutes

Credits:

Concept and choreography: Andrea Božić in collaboration with the Sun, the Moon, the Earth and the weather
Dramaturgical advice: Julia Willms and Robert Pravda
Produced by Tilt as part of SPECTRA

A special viewing in Amsterdam in partnership with ARE YOU ALIVE OR NOT? Looking at ART through the lens of THEATRE organised by the Studium Generale Rietveld Academie at de Brakke Grond, within the frame of the day curated by David Weber Krebs: On Enclosed Spaces and Great Outdoors. For more information and full program, click here  

The performance is presented within the programme of the (Im)Possible Futures Festival in Ghent

Extra:
This performance is the 61st eclipse of Solar Saros 120 series out of 70. The performances began with a series of 7 partial eclipses starting on 27 May 933. The 20 March 2015 eclipse is the 25th total eclipse in the series and actually has one of the longest durations (2 minutes 47 seconds). The next member of the series on 30 March 2033 is the last total eclipse of Saros 120. Each Saros family eclipse shares a very similar geometry: They occur at the same node with the Moon at nearly the same distance from Earth and at the same time of year.

Follow these links for my other performances in collaboration with the weather and night sky

12 September 2014

Aurora: A Choreography for the Sun and the Earth



Dear friends,

We are opening the new Tilt season with a spectacular new performance in collaboration with the Sun:

Aurora: A Choreography for the Sun and the Earth

The performance is a dramatic choreography of forces, a duet featuring the Sun and the Earth. It started on Monday with the first of the two powerful blasts of radiation from the centre of the Sun, followed by a second on Wednesday. The performance will culminate tonight, as the blasts collide with the Earth's protective magnetic shield. The performance features a colourful celestial choreography of these forces on our night sky as the blasts envelop and embrace the Earth.

Aurora: A Choreography for the Sun and the Earth opens tonight, 12 September 2014 simultaneously worldwide in a number of countries further North and South on the globe. We are happy to be able to present the performance as far down south as the Netherlands where we are based, especially for the occasion of the season opening.

Aurora: A Choreography for the Sun and the Earth is an immersive durational spectacle for two celestial bodies and an observer that deals with the questions of drama, control, authorship, personal responsibility and engagement in space-wide events.

This is the third performance in the series of collaborations with the night sky titled Further Investigations Into Choreography, part of the larger cycle of collaborations with the weather titled Telling Future.

To view the trailer click here 


Entrance fee: free

Viewing instructions:
The performance is visible to the naked eye.
Best viewed outside of populated areas, in complete darkness.
Once there, look North (on the northern hemisphere) or South (the southern hemisphere) and low down on the horizon. The performance has a faint and slow beginning.

Disclaimer:
We would like to apologize for the possible power and communications disruptions the performance might cause.

Find a location near you:
If you live on the northern hemisphere click here

 If you live on the southern hemisphere click here
For more information for the Netherlands click here


Credits:
Concept and choreography: Andrea Božić in collaboration with the Sun, the Earth and the weather
Dramaturgy: Julia Willms
Produced by: Tilt

For more information about the other projects in collaboration with the weather and the night sky, click here

Happy new season!

Andrea

21 December 2010

The Darkest Day In Five Centuries




Dear friends,

For the end of 2010, I have prepared a special winter spectacle: the Darkest Day in Five Centuries. The piece will combine the longest night of the year with a total eclipse of the Moon. There will not be another moment of darkness as deep as this again until December 21, 2094. There has not been one since 21 December 1638.

Take a moment to revel in the dark:

21 December 2010

This is the second performance in the series of my collaborations with the night sky titled: Night Sky: Further Investigations Into Choreography. For this dance, the Earth will pass between the Moon and the Sun, colouring the Moon orange, making it Mars-like. It will take place precisely two years before the 21 December 2012 galactic alignment.

It is a durational spectacle visible to the naked eye simultaneously to all viewers in eastern Asia, Australia, North America, South America, Europe, western Africa. However, the local times vary. In Europe (UT), the partial lunar eclipse starts at 6.33 am and the total lunar eclipse at 7.41 am. The performance is visible in its total length from the Americas. In Europe, the total eclipse will merge with the dawn.

For the precise schedule for Benelux click here and for the rest of the world here.

Cloudy where you are? You can follow our online live stream from various locations on the Earth
here.


Enjoy the darkness. For the rest of our lives, it will only get lighter.

Kind regards, happy holidays,


Andrea

______________________

Credits:
Concept and choreography: Andrea Bozic in collaboration with the night sky

Location: eastern Asia, Australia, North America, South America, Europe, western Africa.

Best viewing conditions:
Outdoors and away from city lights
For those in the winter season: indoors close to the window with the lights off

Entrance: free
In case you document the show from various locations I would be very pleased to receive your photos.

Follow these links for my other performances in collaboration with the
weather and night sky

1 January 2009

A Choreography for Moon and Venus


  

Dear friends,

Tonight, I am presenting my special New Year's Eve spectacle:
A Choreography for Moon and Venus.

On December 31st, after sunset, take a moment to look out of your window. High in the southwestern sky, Venus and slender crescent Moon will perform a beautiful conjunction visible for hours after the sunset of the old year. For this New Year's Eve, we will perform the quiet dance of the two brightest objects in the night sky with spectacular participatory fireworks.

This is the first of my performances in the new series of collaborations with the night sky titled Further Investigations Into Choreography.

A Choreography for Moon and Venus is a slow-motion durational participatory spectacle for two celestial bodies, an observer and fireworks. It is a nostalgic ritual of endings and beginnings that deals with the issue of personal responsibility and engagement in spacewide events.

The performance is made to mark 400 years since Galileo's first observations of the night sky using a telescope in 1609. The telescope was invented in the Netherlands by Hans Lippershey, an optician, in 1608.

Entrance: free
Performance visibility: worldwide if the sky is clear by sunset

Credits: Andrea Bozic in collaboration with the Moon, the Venus and the weather

Happy New Year!

Photo taken by Terry Tedon in Alaska